Mix of Teen Wolf gifs, recipes, art and porn. Some cute animals, because who doesn't love baby animals? Some personal stuff, cause I need to vent somewhere no one's listening.

 

comfortspringstation:

Homemade 3 Ingredient Energy Bar

Ingredients Equal Parts:

  • pitted dates about 1 C
  • almonds or almond pieces about 1 C (or nuts of your choice)
  • raisins about 1 C or dried cranberries
  • 1/2 C sunflower seed (optional)

Directions:

  1. Place all ingredients into food processor and blend.
  2. Press between 2 sheets of parchment paper in 9 x 9 or 8 x 8 square pan.
  3. Refrigerate for at least a few hours or overnight.
  4. Cut into 2” squares, separate and wrap with waxed paper.
  5. Store in airtight container.

Dates are very nutritious and paired with nuts are a great energy booster. Sticky but yummy

via indulgy.com

joffersbaratheon:

best tv/movie characters:

[100/??] Tyler Hoechlin as Derek Hale in Teen Wolf (2011 - ??)

↳ “How about this? Either you cut off my arm, or I’m gonna cut off your head. “

1. Trauma permanently changes us.

This is the big, scary truth about trauma: there is no such thing as “getting over it.” The five stages of grief model marks universal stages in learning to accept loss, but the reality is in fact much bigger: a major life disruption leaves a new normal in its wake. There is no “back to the old me.” You are different now, full stop.

This is not a wholly negative thing. Healing from trauma can also mean finding new strength and joy. The goal of healing is not a papering-over of changes in an effort to preserve or present things as normal. It is to acknowledge and wear your new life — warts, wisdom, and all — with courage.

2. Presence is always better than distance.

There is a curious illusion that in times of crisis people “need space.” I don’t know where this assumption originated, but in my experience it is almost always false. Trauma is a disfiguring, lonely time even when surrounded in love; to suffer through trauma alone is unbearable. Do not assume others are reaching out, showing up, or covering all the bases.

It is a much lighter burden to say, “Thanks for your love, but please go away,” than to say, “I was hurting and no one cared for me.” If someone says they need space, respect that. Otherwise, err on the side of presence.

3. Healing is seasonal, not linear.

It is true that healing happens with time. But in the recovery wilderness, emotional healing looks less like a line and more like a wobbly figure-8. It’s perfectly common to get stuck in one stage for months, only to jump to another end entirely … only to find yourself back in the same old mud again next year.

Recovery lasts a long, long time. Expect seasons.

4. Surviving trauma takes “firefighters” and “builders.” Very few people are both.

This is a tough one. In times of crisis, we want our family, partner, or dearest friends to be everything for us. But surviving trauma requires at least two types of people: the crisis team — those friends who can drop everything and jump into the fray by your side, and the reconstruction crew — those whose calm, steady care will help nudge you out the door into regaining your footing in the world. In my experience, it is extremely rare for any individual to be both a firefighter and a builder. This is one reason why trauma is a lonely experience. Even if you share suffering with others, no one else will be able to fully walk the road with you the whole way.

A hard lesson of trauma is learning to forgive and love your partner, best friend, or family even when they fail at one of these roles. Conversely, one of the deepest joys is finding both kinds of companions beside you on the journey.

5. Grieving is social, and so is healing.

For as private a pain as trauma is, for all the healing that time and self-work will bring, we are wired for contact. Just as relationships can hurt us most deeply, it is only through relationship that we can be most fully healed.

It’s not easy to know what this looks like — can I trust casual acquaintances with my hurt? If my family is the source of trauma, can they also be the source of healing? How long until this friend walks away? Does communal prayer help or trivialize?

Seeking out shelter in one another requires tremendous courage, but it is a matter of life or paralysis. One way to start is to practice giving shelter to others.

6. Do not offer platitudes or comparisons. Do not, do not, do not.

“I’m so sorry you lost your son, we lost our dog last year … ” “At least it’s not as bad as … ” “You’ll be stronger when this is over.” “God works in all things for good!”

When a loved one is suffering, we want to comfort them. We offer assurances like the ones above when we don’t know what else to say. But from the inside, these often sting as clueless, careless, or just plain false.

Trauma is terrible. What we need in the aftermath is a friend who can swallow her own discomfort and fear, sit beside us, and just let it be terrible for a while.

7. Allow those suffering to tell their own stories.

Of course, someone who has suffered trauma may say, “This made me stronger,” or “I’m lucky it’s only (x) and not (z).” That is their prerogative. There is an enormous gulf between having someone else thrust his unsolicited or misapplied silver linings onto you, and discovering hope for one’s self. The story may ultimately sound very much like “God works in all things for good,” but there will be a galaxy of disfigurement and longing and disorientation in that confession. Give the person struggling through trauma the dignity of discovering and owning for himself where, and if, hope endures.

8. Love shows up in unexpected ways.

This is a mystifying pattern after trauma, particularly for those in broad community: some near-strangers reach out, some close friends fumble to express care. It’s natural for us to weight expressions of love differently: a Hallmark card, while unsatisfying if received from a dear friend, can be deeply touching coming from an old acquaintance.

Ultimately every gesture of love, regardless of the sender, becomes a step along the way to healing. If there are beatitudes for trauma, I’d say the first is, “Blessed are those who give love to anyone in times of hurt, regardless of how recently they’ve talked or awkwardly reconnected or visited cross-country or ignored each other on the metro.” It may not look like what you’d request or expect, but there will be days when surprise love will be the sweetest.

9. Whatever doesn’t kill you …

In 2011, after a publically humiliating year, comedian Conan O’Brien gave students at Dartmouth College the following warning:

"Nietzsche famously said, ‘Whatever doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.’ … What he failed to stress is that it almost kills you.”
Odd things show up after a serious loss and creep into every corner of life: insatiable anxiety in places that used to bring you joy, detachment or frustration towards your closest companions, a deep distrust of love or presence or vulnerability.

There will be days when you feel like a quivering, cowardly shell of yourself, when despair yawns as a terrible chasm, when fear paralyzes any chance for pleasure. This is just a fight that has to be won, over and over and over again.

10. … Doesn’t kill you.

Living through trauma may teach you resilience. It may help sustain you and others in times of crisis down the road. It may prompt humility. It may make for deeper seasons of joy. It may even make you stronger.

It also may not.

In the end, the hope of life after trauma is simply that you have life after trauma. The days, in their weird and varied richness, go on. So will you.

Catherine Woodiwiss, “A New Normal: Ten Things I’ve Learned About Trauma”  

geesh this was nice to read

(via underunderstood)

(Source: soishothimintheface)

I think one thing you can do to help your friends who are depressed is to reach out to them not in the spirit of helping, but in the spirit of liking them and wanting their company. “I’m here to help if you ever need me” is good to know, but hard to act on, especially when you’re in a dark place. Specific, ongoing, pleasure-based invitations are much easier to absorb. “I’m here. Let’s go to the movies. Or stay in and order takeout and watch some dumb TV.” “I’m having a party, it would be really great if you could come for a little while.” Ask them for help with things you know they are good at and like doing, so there is reciprocity and a way for them to contribute. “Will you come over Sunday and help me clear my closet of unfashionable and unflattering items? I trust your eye.” “Will you read this story I wrote and help me fix the dialogue?” “Want to make dinner together? You chop, I’ll assemble.” “I am going glasses shopping and I need another set of eyes.” Remind yourself why you like this person, and in the process, remind them that they are likable and worth your time and interest.

Talk to the parts of the person that aren’t being eaten by the depression. Make it as easy as possible to make and keep plans, if you have the emotional resources to be the initiator and to meet your friends a little more than halfway. If the person turns down a bunch of invitations in a row because (presumably) they don’t have the energy to be social, respect their autonomy by giving it a month or two and then try again. Keep the invitations simple; “Any chance we could have breakfast Saturday?” > “ARE YOU AVOIDING ME BECAUSE YOU’RE DEPRESSED OR BECAUSE YOU HATE ME I AM ONLY TRYING TO HELP YOU.” “I miss you and I want to see you” > “I’m worried about you.” A depressed person is going to have a shame spiral about how their shame is making them avoid you and how that’s giving them more shame, which is making them avoid you no matter what you do. No need for you to call attention to it. Just keep asking. “I want to see you” “Let’s do this thing.” “If you are feeling low, I understand, and I don’t want to impose on you, but I miss your face. Please come have coffee with me.” “Apology accepted. ApologIES accepted. So. Gelato and Outlander?”

#613: How do I reach out to my friends who have depression? | Captain Awkward

P.S. A lot of people with depression and other mental illnesses have trouble making decisions or choosing from a bunch of different options. “Wanna get dinner at that pizza place on Tuesday night?” is a LOT easier to answer than “So wanna hang out sometime? What do you want to do?”

(via startrekrenegades)

'have trouble making decisions or choosing from a bunch of different options' sometimes it’s just that everything is meh and nothing is fun. Make it easier to say yes and I know I’m more likely to.

And appreciate the good days. Be grateful for the time spent, the jobs done. No matter how small.

Played 142,333 times

deans-fucking-fallen-angel:

sassykylesimmons:

all-this-bastille:

playalchemy:

Three different versions of Pompeii. Capitol Studios, Brit Awards performance, and the original. I don’t know what happened.

This is… AMAZING

It’s like a beautiful choir of dan smiths

jesus
 christ

what

xshiromorix:

snarliekelly:

agentbering:

jessepumpkin:

i can only handle so much socializing until i get tired and start getting irritated towards everyone and want to go home and sleep or lock myself in my room and go on the computer

This is what it means to be an introvert. Not being shy. This.

I’m not antisocial.  I just have a shelf life.

(Source: pinkmanjesse)

dirtydirtychai:

paralian-slytherin:

desidere:

cbrachyrhynchos:

nineprotons:

notapaladin:

prettylittlerobbers:

missolivialouise:

Here’s a thing I’ve had around in my head for a while!

Okay, so I’m pretty sure that by now everyone at least is aware of Steampunk, with it’s completely awesome Victorian sci-fi aesthetic. But what I want to see is Solarpunk – a plausible near-future sci-fi genre, which I like to imagine as based on updated Art Nouveau, Victorian, and Edwardian aesthetics, combined with a green and renewable energy movement to create a world in which children grow up being taught about building electronic tech as well as food gardening and other skills, and people have come back around to appreciating artisans and craftspeople, from stonemasons and smithies, to dress makers and jewelers, and everyone in between. A balance of sustainable energy-powered tech, environmental cities, and wicked cool aesthetics. 

A lot of people seem to share a vision of futuristic tech and architecture that looks a lot like an ipod – smooth and geometrical and white. Which imo is a little boring and sterile, which is why I picked out an Art Nouveau aesthetic for this.

With energy costs at a low, I like to imagine people being more inclined to focus their expendable income on the arts!

Aesthetically my vision of solarpunk is very similar to steampunk, but with electronic technology, and an Art Nouveau veneer.

So here are some buzz words~

Natural colors!
Art Nouveau!
Handcrafted wares!
Tailors and dressmakers!
Streetcars!
Airships!
Stained glass window solar panels!!!
Education in tech and food growing!
Less corporate capitalism, and more small businesses!
Solar rooftops and roadways!
Communal greenhouses on top of apartments!
Electric cars with old-fashioned looks!
No-cars-allowed walkways lined with independent shops!
Renewable energy-powered Art Nouveau-styled tech life!

Can you imagine how pretty it would be to have stained glass windows everywhere that are actually solar panels? The tech is already headed in that direction!  Or how about wide-brim hats, or parasols that are topped with discreet solar panel tech incorporated into the design, with ports you can stick your phone charger in to?

(((Character art by me; click the cityscape pieces to see artist names)))

i am so into this wow

sign me the fuck up

I want a solarpunk future. *_*

Wow.

SOLARPUNK OH MY GODDDDDD i love it

CURVY ORGANIC LINES, REFLECT NATURE, FLORALS VEGETATION, UGHHHH I WANT IT 

I know I already reblogged this but THE IDEA OF SOLARPUNK IS SO COOL AND I WANT EVERYONE TO KNOW ABOUT IT

Wow I am very taken with this. A punk aesthetic that looks forward rather than looking back and romanticizing European colonialism. I do love me some steampunk, but the weight of all that brass and those layers of clothes and the brown and greyness of it all is very… yeah, weighty. Dark and drab and heavy, no matter where its set, like it takes English winters with it. I love the light, Miyazaki-like feel of these images, which inspires to me a kind of hopefulness about the future that we could achieve together. 

Also interested in what this kind of world would be like in places like India or South America, places that are generally ignored except for their exploratory and exploitative value in steampunk that is set in alternate versions of the real world. My first thought when I saw this was of the great green wall of Africa. Afropunk is already so creative and fantastical; what better place to set a solarpunk story?

etteluor:

listoflifehacks:

If you like this list of life hacks, follow ListOfLifeHacks for more like it!

I couldn’t have clicked the motherfucking follow button faster after I saw the pinata cookies with mini m&m’s inside holy shit let me tell you

kseniayf:

    My little mermaid…


Far out in the ocean, where the water is as blue as the prettiest             cornflower, and as clear as crystal

thesylverlining:

winterwombat:

the-enchanted-mermaid:

Meet the World’s Smallest Rabbit.

Columbia Basin Pygmy Rabbits are the world’s smallest and among the rarest. 

Miniature bunnies with iridescent ears. Happiness, embodied as a tiny ball of fluff and cute.

TINY BUN WITH COLORFUL EARS ;____;

Why have I never seen this before?

Weekend Giveaway - Rare Familiar Edition!

helarniasdragons:

Sorry it was quiet today - posting the weekend giveaway a little early because I have absolutely no idea what’s going to be going on tomorrow! I’ve been so busy with the craziness going on in my life, (mostly good craziness!♥), and with geeking out over the FFXIV festival that I haven’t had time…

Leiari 45515